As the Mid-Autumn Festival approaches, people cannot help preparing their own renditions of mooncakes. Generally, a mooncake has two parts, namely: (1) a shell or casing, and (2) a filling. Though its parts can seemingly be basic, its numerous and creative pairings would certainly make you drool for more. Making a mooncake also involves the use of decorative moulds that leave intricate designs and patterns on the mooncake. Petite as it may seem, mooncakes come with closely packed fillings; thus making the 250-gram round cake explode with flavours.These are given as gifts to families, relatives, and friends during the festival. Though mooncakes are still offered as gifts,nowadays, its flavours have innovated into something more special and distinct to specific countries where it was made and developed.  

 

South China’s Cantonese Mooncakes

With its roots tracing back to the Guangdong Province in South China, the Cantonese Mooncakes do not shy away from the traditional ones. These Cantonese Mooncakes come with perfectly golden brown skin with lotus paste seed filling, which can be considered as one of luxurious mooncake fillings. Known for its sweet taste, these mooncakes would be the perfect match with a cup of hot tea.

Hong Kong’s Crystal Mooncakes

Originated from Hong Kong, these Crystal Mooncakes are different from the traditional baked ones as these are chilled desserts. Coated in glutinous rice flour, its texture resembles that of a chewy mochi’s. Its sweet fillings commonly include lotus paste or red bean paste. Though it originated in Hong Kong, these Crystal Mooncakes have increased its popularity in other parts of Asia; hence, coining it with a different term but essentially the same. In fact, it has a variety of fruit flavourings. One of the most known is the snowskin mooncake singapore, which can come in durian or chia seeds with lotus paste flavour.

Philippines’ Hopia

Translated as “good cakes”, Hopias can be found in Philippines not only during Mid-Autumn Festival but all throughout the year. Known for its flaky pastry skin, hopias are filled with sweetened mung bean paste. Compared to Cantonese Mooncakes, hopias are relatively flat; however, unlike Crystal Mooncakes, hopias taste best when eaten warm. It also comes in different flavours such as ube, mongo, and coconut.

Traditionally, mooncakesare prepared in either Guangdong-style, Beijing-style, Suzhou-style, or Yunnan-style. All of which are commonly filled with lotus seed paste, jujube paste, five kernels, or egg yolk. Though mooncakescome in various sizes, colors, pastry skins, and fillings, it never fails to embody the concepts of unity and completeness, as it complements the true essence of a Mid-Autumn Festival.

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